Critical Development

Language design, framework development, UI design, robotics and more.

Windows Azure: Internet Operating System

Posted by Dan Vanderboom on October 27, 2008

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As I write this during the keynote of PDC 2008, Ray Ozzie is announcing (with a great deal of excitement) a new Windows-branded Internet operating system called Windows Azure.  Tipping their hats to work done by Amazon.com with their EC2 (Elastic Cloud Computing) service, Microsoft is finally revealing their vision for a world-wide, scalable, cloud services platform that looks forward toward the next fifty years.

Windows Azure, presumably named for the color of the sky, is being released today as a CTP in the United States, and will be rolled out soon across the rest of the planet.  This new Internet platform came together over the past few years after a common set of scalable technologies emerged behind the scenes across MSN, Live, MSDN, XBox Live, Zune, and other global online services.  Azure is the vehicle for delivering that expertise as a platform to Microsoft developers around the world.

SQL Server Data Services, now called SQL Services (storage, data mining, reporting), .NET Services (federated identity, workflows, etc.), SharePoint Services, Live Services (synchronization), and Dynamics/CRM Services are provided as examples of services moving immediately to Windows Azure, with many more on their way, both from Microsoft and from third parties such as Bluehoo.com, a social networking technology using Bluetooth on Windows Mobile cell phones to discover and interact with others nearby.

The promise of a globally distributed collection of data centers offering unlimited scalability, automatic load-balancing, intelligent data synchronization, and model-driven service lifecycle management is very exciting.  Hints of this new offering could be seen from podcasts, articles, and TechEd sessions earlier this year on cloud services in general, talk of Software-As-Service (SAS), Software+Services, the Internet Service Bus, and the ill-named BizTalk Services.

The development experience looks pretty solid, even this early in the game.  Testing can be done on your local development machine, without having to upload your service to the cloud, and all of the cloud services APIs will be available, all while leveraging existing skills with ASP.NET, web services, WCF and WF, and more.  Publishing to the cloud involves the same Publish context menu item you’re used to in deploying your web applications today, except that you’ll end up at a web page where you’ll upload two files.  Actual service start time may take a few minutes.

Overall, this is a very exciting offering.  Because of Microsoft’s commitment to building and supporting open platforms, it’s hard to imagine what kinds of products and services this will lead to, how this will catalyze the revolution to cloud services that has already begun.

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