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Archive for December, 2009

Animate.NET: Fluent Animation Library for Silverlight & WPF

Posted by Dan Vanderboom on December 31, 2009

Overview

The basic idea—in Silverlight and WPF—that an animation is just a change in some DependencyProperty over time is simple and powerful.  However, at that level of detail, the API for defining and managing complex animations involves writing a ton of code.  There are code-less animations, of course, such as those created in the Visual State Manager, but when you want to perform really dynamic animations, state-based animations can become impractical or outright impossible.

In response to this, I’ve published my fluent-style code-based animation library for Silverlight and WPF on CodePlex at http://animatedotnet.codeplex.com.  This is an API for making code-based animations intuitive and simple without having to write dozens or even hundreds of lines of code to create and configure storyboards, keyframes, perform repetitive math to calculate alignment, rotation, and other low-level details that distract one from the original purpose of the animation.  In one example, I counted over 120 lines of standard storyboard code, and with the abstractions and fluent API I’ve come up with, reduced that down to half a dozen lines of beautiful, pure intent.  As a result, it’s much more readable and faster to write.

I was initially inspired by Nigel Sampson from his blog article on building a Silverlight animation framework.  The code on his site was a good first step in creating higher-level abstractions, going above DoubleAnimation to define PositionAnimation and RotationAnimation, and I decided to build on top of that, adding other abstractions as well as a fluent-style API in the form of extension methods that hide even those classes.

Concepts

All Animate.NET animations derive from the Animation class which tracks the UI element being modified, the duration of animation, whether it has completed, and fires an event when the animation completes.  It manages building and executing the Storyboard object so you don’t have to.

Subclasses of Animation currently include OpacityAnimation, PositionAnimation, RotationAnimation, SizeAnimation, TransformAnimation, and GroupAnimation.  TransformAnimation is the parent class of RotateAnimation, and in the future ScaleAnimation and TranslateAnimation may also be included.

GroupAnimation is special because it allows you to combine multiple animations.  These groups can be nested and each group can include a wait time before starting (to stagger animations).

The Animate static class includes all of the extension methods that make up the fluent API, and the intention is for this to be the master class for building complex group animations.  Most of these methods come in pairs: you can RotateTo a specific angle or RotateBy relative to your current angle; MoveTo a specific location or MoveBy relative to your current position, etc.

Here’s the list so far:

  • Group and Wait
  • Fade, FadeIn, FadeOut, and CrossFade
  • RotateTo and RotateBy
  • ResizeTo and ResizeBy
  • MoveTo and MoveBy

Examples

Animate.NET can best be understood and appreciated with examples.

Basic Animations

Let’s say you want to resize an element to a new size.  Normally you’d need a storyboard and two DoubleAnimations: one for x and another for y, and for each you’d need to set several properties.  With Animate.NET, you can define and execute your animation beginning with a reference to the element you want to animate:

var rect = new Rectangle()
{
    Height = 250,
    Width = 350,
    Fill = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Blue)
};
MainStage.Children.Add(rect);
rect.SetPosition(50, 50);

rect.ResizeTo(150, 150, 1.5.seconds()).Begin();


Only a single line of code, the last one, is needed to resize the rect element.

Note the call to Begin.  Without this, the ResizeTo (and all other fluent API calls) will return an object that derives from Animation but will not run.  We can, if needed, obtain a reference to the animation and begin the animation separately, like this:

var anim = rect.ResizeTo(150, 150, 1.5.seconds());
anim.Begin();


This allows us to compose animations into groups and manipulate animations after they’ve started, and is very similar to how LINQ queries are composed and later executed.

You’ll also notice the use of several other extension methods:

  • SetPosition – sets Left and Top currently.  In future versions, you’ll be able to define a registration point for positioning that may be located elsewhere, such as the center of the element.
  • seconds() – along with milliseconds, minutes, etc., allows you to specify a TimeSpan object more fluently.  I saw this in some Ruby code and loved it.  If only the C# team would implement extension properties, it would look even cleaner (eliminate the need for parentheses).
  • Center() and GetCenter() – centers an element immediately, and gets a Point object representing the center of the object respectively.  Not used in these examples, but worth mentioning.

Group Animations

Next I’ll show an example of a group animation using the Animate class’s Group method:

Animate.Group(
    rect.RotateBy(rect.GetCenter(), -90, 1.seconds()),
    rect.FadeOut(1.seconds())
    ).Begin();


This group animation contains two child animations: one to rotate the rectangle 90 degrees counterclockwise, and the other to fade the rectangle out (make it completely transparent).  The method takes a params array, so you can include as many animations as you like.

Because the animations listed are peers in the group, they begin running at the same time.  Often you will want to stagger animations, however.  You can accomplish this with the Wait method, which is the Group method in disguise (it simply includes an additional TimeSpan parameter).

Animate.Group(
    rect.RotateBy(rect.GetCenter(), -90, 1.5.seconds()),
    rect.FadeIn(0.5.seconds()),
    Animate.Wait(1.seconds(),
        rect.FadeOut(0.5.seconds())
        )
    ).Begin();


This animation rotates the rectangle for 1.5 seconds.  During the first 0.5 seconds, it fades in; during the last 0.5 seconds, it fades out.  Only one element, rect, was used in this example, but any number of UI elements can participate.

Animations can be nested and staggered to arbitrary complexity.  Because all animations derive from the Animation class, you can write properties or methods to encapsulate group animations, and assemble them programmatically before executing them.  Because all the ceremony of storyboards and keyframes is abstracted away, it’s very easy to see what’s happening in this code in terms of the end result.

Method Chaining

One of the benefits of a fluent API is the ability to chain together methods that modify a primary object.  For example, the Animation class defines a WhenComplete method that can be used to respond to the completion of an animation.  In the samples project on CodePlex, I create new UI objects at the beginning of each animation, and remove them afterward:

rect.ResizeTo(150, 150, 1.5.seconds())
    .WhenComplete(a =>
    {
        Thread.Sleep(2000);
        MainStage.Children.Remove(rect);
    })
    .Begin();


I pause for a couple seconds after displaying the final result before removing that object from its container.

Extension methods will be used more in the future for this library.  Uses will include modifying the animation to apply easing functions, responding to collision detection (by stopping or reversing), and so on.  This might end up looking something like:

rect.ResizeTo(150, 150, 1.5.seconds())
    .Ease(EasingFunction.Cubic(0.5))
    .StopIf(a => Animate.Collision(GetCollisionObjects()))
    .Begin();
 

Feedback and Future Direction

I’m releasing this as a very early experiment, and I’m interested in your feedback on the library and its API.

What kind of functionality would you like to see added?  Do the method names and syntax feel right?  What major, common animation scenarios have I omitted?  What other kinds of samples would you like to see?

Download the library and samples and give it a try!

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Posted in Algorithms, Animation, Composability, Data Structures, Design Patterns, Dynamic Programming, Fluent API, Silverlight, WPF | 5 Comments »